East Greenland Expedition. Part II: Kulusuk

East Greenland Expedition II: Kulusuk

I spent all night photographing the amazing sunset (22:00) and the sunrise of the new day (04:00).

Today, a helicopter will bring our team and me from Ammassalik to Kulusuk, a small and remote island in the East Greenlandic area.

There you can find one of Greenland‘s most busy airports: 5 arrivals per day and departures 6 days a week from Reykjavik, Iceland.
East Greenland Expedition II: Kulusuk

East Greenland Expedition II: Kulusuk

East Greenland Expedition II: Kulusuk

The island is relatively small, so hiking from the airport to the village takes no more than 40 minutes. It is an interesting walk that takes us across the Arctic tundra, which is carpeted in Arctic flowers and glacier buttercups. We have to by-pass the eerie mountain lake before descending to the village.


East Greenland Expedition II: Kulusuk
In 1930, 165 Inuit inhabited Kulusuk. Today 320 live here making the settlement the 2nd largest in the Ammassalik Municipality. We meet Erika who lives in the Kulusuk settlement; she says: “We have remained relatively immune to Western influence despite the regular influx of tourists. We really love this way of life and also love the fact that other people respect the elements of our civilization”.
East Greenland Expedition II: Kulusuk

East Greenland Expedition II: Kulusuk

Kulusuk people are mainly fishermen; they use “kayak“ for hunting the large mammals of the sea.

East Greenland Expedition II: Kulusuk

East Greenland Expedition II: Kulusuk

Developed through the experience of generations and adapted to the hunting needs of the Greenlandic Inuit, kayaks and “umiaq“ (the women’s boat) constitute a living proof of the adaptability to the arctic environment.


East Greenland Expedition II: Kulusuk
Inuit are fully dependent on marine resources; as a result, they show an interest in environmental changes that may affect their region.

They really see that the Arctic sea ice has reached its lowest level and size ever.

East Greenland Expedition II: Kulusuk

They can see that there is probably less ice overall in the Arctic this year than in any other year since monitoring began. Inuit realize the seriousness of the situation; “it is an Evil sign“, they say. They feel around them marine species experiencing negative effects as climate change heavily affects the ice platform on which they rely. Inuit believe in God; they also believe in “civilized world”.

They dedicate us the Hunter’s Song: “Though Greenland is nothing but slush / though I am living here surrounded by ice / though the only thing I see is icebergs / though my stomach is usually empty / Above all, I am full of joy!!!”.